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d.c.cameron_and_the_gothic_line [2019/10/31 14:54]
johnwoodrow
d.c.cameron_and_the_gothic_line [2019/10/31 14:57]
johnwoodrow
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 Farley Mowat wrote of then Lt Col D C Cameron of Lochiel, the most decorated Glengarrian of the 2nd World War: Farley Mowat wrote of then Lt Col D C Cameron of Lochiel, the most decorated Glengarrian of the 2nd World War:
 +
 //"It was dark before the plans were completed and as the CO gave his orders one new Company commander could not conceal his doubts; “Sir”, he said. “We’ll never make it”. //"It was dark before the plans were completed and as the CO gave his orders one new Company commander could not conceal his doubts; “Sir”, he said. “We’ll never make it”.
 Cameron showed his mettle. ​ As if the interruption had not taken place he continued in his quiet voice to give the details of the battle. ​ His placidity in what seemed to most of his officers to be a suicidal action, perhaps made the difference between defeat and victory”.//​ Cameron showed his mettle. ​ As if the interruption had not taken place he continued in his quiet voice to give the details of the battle. ​ His placidity in what seemed to most of his officers to be a suicidal action, perhaps made the difference between defeat and victory”.//​
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 |  The Cameron Farm  | |  The Cameron Farm  |
    
-Donald Cameron was the son of Robert William and Elizabeth Cameron. ​ He was born on 5<​sup>​th</​sup>​ April 1911 on the family farm, Lot 35, Concession 5 in Lochiel Township. ​ This is a little east of the Fassifern cross roads. ​ When DC was five years old he was smitten with the long recruiting march of the 154th Overseas Battalion CEF pipe band as it wove its way through the Counties. ​ Family lore has it that he wanted to wear a uniform just like the soldiers. ​ His mother made him a uniform, and on visits to Alexandria, nothing delighted the boy more than watching the recruits drilling at the Armoury during the latter years of World War I.+Donald Cameron was the son of Robert William and Elizabeth Cameron. ​ He was born on 5<​sup>​th</​sup>​ April 1911 on the family farm, Lot 35, Concession 5 in Lochiel Township. ​ This is a little east of the Fassifern cross roads. ​ When DC was five years old he was smitten with the long recruiting march of the 154<​sup>​th</​sup> ​Overseas Battalion CEF pipe band as it wove its way through the Counties. ​ Family lore has it that he wanted to wear a uniform just like the soldiers. ​ His mother made him a uniform, and on visits to Alexandria, nothing delighted the boy more than watching the recruits drilling at the Armoury during the latter years of World War I.
  
 DC was educated at Alexandria High School and in 1926 went to work at Courtaulds synthetic fibres plant in Cornwall. He also had a dream of becoming an engineer, though there is no evidence of Courtaulds having an apprentice program. ​ His desire to become a soldier remained strong and he joined the Militia, the recently formed SD&G Highlanders. ​ In 1928 DC received his commission in the Regiment. Robert Cameron died in 1936, aged 55. Elizabeth moved to Cornwall to live with DC at 308 Pitt Street. DC was educated at Alexandria High School and in 1926 went to work at Courtaulds synthetic fibres plant in Cornwall. He also had a dream of becoming an engineer, though there is no evidence of Courtaulds having an apprentice program. ​ His desire to become a soldier remained strong and he joined the Militia, the recently formed SD&G Highlanders. ​ In 1928 DC received his commission in the Regiment. Robert Cameron died in 1936, aged 55. Elizabeth moved to Cornwall to live with DC at 308 Pitt Street.
d.c.cameron_and_the_gothic_line.txt · Last modified: 2019/10/31 14:57 by johnwoodrow