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Xample - Glengarry County

GLENGARRY was established in 1792 as one of Upper Canada’s first 19 counties and named after the Glen in Inverness Scotland, bordering the Garry River. Originally extending from the St. Lawrence to the Ottawa Rivers, the County was subsequently divided in half to create Prescott. Glengarry was settled by Scottish Loyalists, and 1,217 clansmen comprising five emigrant groups arriving from the Scottish Highlands between 1785 and 1793.

LANCASTER

Lancaster was named after the English county of the same name. In addition George III was Duke of Lancaster before he became King. The first “free land” the Loyalists encountered in 1784, it was dubbed the “Lake” or “Sunken” township since the land was considered too swampy to be habitable by the Loyalists.

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Nevertheless, Surveyor Lieutenant Walter Sutherland and his men found it to their liking and settled here. By October of 1784 a report of Disbanded Troops and Loyalists stated that Township No. 1 had 36 men, 15 women and 39 children. The town of Lancaster grew along the waterfront. The inauguration of steamships on Lake St. Francis in 1826 from Montreal turned South Lancaster into the “Gateway to Glengarry.” This was reinforced when the Grand Trunk Railway opened its station a little more than a kilometre north of the Raisin River creating New Lancaster or the Upper Village.

CHARLOTTENBURG

was named after Charlotte, King George III’s wife. Originally settled by Loyalists, the Township was “generally” settled in 1786 by the Knoydart Highland Scot Catholic emigrants. These two Townships were created on January 1, 1850 and amalgamated on January 1, 1998 to create

SOUTH GLENGARRY

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xample.txt · Last modified: 2014/12/15 18:08 by admin